Hitler’s Olympics and The Olympic Village

Berlin 1936 Olympic Games 

Athletic festival held in Berlin that took place Aug. 1–16, 1936. The Berlin Games were the 10th occurrence of the modern Olympic Games.

The 1936 Olympics were held in a tense, politically charged atmosphere. The Nazi Party had risen to power in 1933, two years after Berlin was awarded the Games, and its racist policies led to international debate about a boycott of the Games.

Fearing a mass boycott, the International Olympic Committee pressured the German government and received assurances that qualified Jewish athletes would be part of the German team and that the Games would not be used to promote Nazi ideology. Adolf Hitler’s government, however, routinely failed to deliver on such promises.

Only one athlete of Jewish descent was a member of the German team Helene Mayer: Fencing for the Fuhrer); pamphlets and speeches about the natural superiority of the Aryan race were commonplace; and the Reich Sports Field, a newly constructed sports complex that covered 325 acres (131.5 hectares) and included four stadiums, was draped in Nazi banners and symbols.

Nonetheless, the attraction of a spirited sports competition was too great, and in the end 49 countries chose to attend the Olympic Games in Berlin.

The Berlin Olympics also featured advancements in media coverage. It was the first Olympic competition to use telex transmissions of results, and zeppelins were used to quickly transport newsreel footage to other European cities. The Games were televised for the first time, transmitted by closed circuit to specially equipped theaters in Berlin.

The 1936 Games also introduced the torch relay by which the Olympic flame is transported from Greece.

Nearly 4,000 athletes competed in 129 events. The track-and-field competition starred American Jesse Owens, who won three individual gold medals and a fourth as a member of the triumphant U.S. 4 × 100-metre relay team. Altogether Owens and his teammates won 12 men’s track-and-field gold medals; the success of Owens and the other African American athletes,

referred to as “black auxiliaries” by the Nazi press, was considered a particular blow to Hitler’s Aryan ideals. The Defiant One.

However, the Germans did win the most medals overall, dominating the gymnastics, rowing, and equestrian events.

Hendrika (“Rie”) Mastenbroek of the Netherlands won three gold medals and a silver in the swimming competition. Basketball, an Olympic event for the first time in 1936, was won by the U.S. team. Canoeing also debuted as an Olympic sport.

Exploring the old village

Having looked forward to exploring this place for so long, it was very disappointing after I arrived at Elston Station, after a very long walk on a blazing hot day to the Olympic Village.

Walking around the out side for quite a long way to find an easy way in, there was no easy way in so I climbed the fence.

Walking towards the Village there was loads of old eastern block old Russian army housing blocks of flats, In the village was the old original chalets where the sports stars stayed for the duration of the games.

This wasn’t like a normal explore as the whole village is being restored to how it once was, and most of the building were well locked up and it does have tours etc visiting the place,but there was no sign of security or anything whilst I was in there, so it was a bit disappointing not to have got into most buildings.

 

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